Newbury Portion

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Tag: culture

Kubrick A Retrospective

For Stanley Kubrick's fans it is apparent he offers us a look into surreal worlds which challenge our sense of being and morality. But his works are richly layered and offer a broader look at both the future as well as a look into the past when they were created.

Now London is home of a retrospective dedicated to Kubrick's work and rich sense of director until September.

The exhibit honors the renowned director, screenwriter and film producer, marking the 20th anniversary after his death. It shows his creative process; step by step, throughout the whole creative process and gives us a look at one of one of the most acclaimed filmmakers of the 20th century.

Many of the objects are on loan, belonging in private collections and and are now shown for the first time. His daughter Katharina Kubrick, said: "It's all our stuff, all of Dad's stuff. We had them at home, he never threw anything away. Everything was carefully cataloged and kept in boxes. When we moved, it all came with us. I don't think he'd envisage an exhibition, but there was a reason he didn't throw anything."

Awards and iconic movie objects like from films like: "2001" or "Clockwork Orange " are on display at the exhibition.

Kubrick, who was born in New York, moved to London at the beginning of the 60s which became the center of cinematographic operations for the director.

For Kubrick it only seemed logical to use it as a setting for all of his films which was also extraordinary for the time. That is why it is was really the only choice for a retrospective were made in London. He was a master when it came time to recreate these worlds audiences enter when they watch his films. It might be a hotel in the Rockies or for battlefields in ietnam, or space, were ever it was he could transport you there.

About 500 objects are included in the exhibition which lasts until the 15th of September at the Design Museum of London.

The Venice Art Biennial 2019

The Venice Art Biennial 2019 has opened its doors to the public this Saturday and what I wouldn't give to visit it. Not just this year, but generally speaking, sometime.

For those of you who may not be familiar with it:

The Venice Biennale (/ˌbiːɛˈnɑːleɪ, -li/; Italian: La Biennale di Venezia [la bi.enˈnaːle di veˈnɛttsja]; in English also called the "Venice Biennial") refers to an arts organization based in Venice and the name of the original and principal biennial exhibition the organization presents. The organization changed its name to the Biennale Foundation in 2009, while the exhibition is now called the Art Biennale to distinguish it from the organisation and other exhibitions the Foundation organizes.

The Art Biennale, a contemporary visual art exhibition and so called because it is held biennially (in odd-numbered years), is the original biennale on which others in the world have been modeled. The Biennale Foundation has a continuous existence supporting the arts.

This year the Golden Lion for the best pavilion has been for Lithuania by the "Sol y Mar" facility, an artificial beach inside the Arsenal's historic building.

The central exhibition is spread over the old Venetian shipyards and in the Giardini. One of the most shocking facilities is perhaps "Barca nostra ", a ship from Libya that sank in 2015, with more than 700 immigrants and refugees aboard. The Swiss artist Cristoph Büchel's project echoes again this drama, one of the worst shipwrecks of the 21st century.

And it really does have a haunting appeal to it.

"I think it is a good thing that the ship is here, as it should be regarded as a reminder of our present. It is not something that no longer exists, something that can be ignored but something that can happen again and unfortunately occurs almost every day in the Mediterranean," laments Carlotta Sami, regional spokesperson for UNHCR in southern Europe.

Special mention for the Mexican Teresa Margolles has re-envisioned the city's canals as a large concrete wall with concertinas to question the public about the divisions and violence that exists in the world.

The Israeli pavilion takes the appearance of an ER in which the visitor can see with despair that there are still 200 numbers ahead in the waiting room…

If you are lucky enough to be in Venice you will have the chance to visit the Venice Biennial until the 24th of November.

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